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Syracuse University to host sessions on Trump’s immigration ban executive order

Moriah Ratner | Staff Photographer

President Donald Trump signed executive order last week Friday that prevents people from Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from entering the country for the next 90 days, and all refugee admissions for 120 days.

In response to President Donald Trump’s executive order restricting travel from certain countries, Syracuse University will hold two discussion sessions on immigration issues next week.

In an email sent to the university community Friday afternoon, the university announced there will be two Campus Open Houses sessions on Tuesday, Feb. 7 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 4 to 6 p.m at the Slutzker Center for International Services on 310 Walnut Place. The sessions will be hosted by the Slutzker Center and SU’s Office of General Counsel, according to the email sent by Daniel French, senior vice president and general counsel, and M. Dolan Evanovich, senior vice president for enrollment and the student experience.

The Office of the General Counsel attorneys and Sluztker Center staff will be available for “one-on-one conversations” with any students, faculty or staff who are concerned of the effect of Trump’s executive order, according to the email.

Trump signed executive order last week Friday that prevents people from Syria, Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan and Yemen from entering the country for the next 90 days, and all refugee admissions for 120 days. This order also includes those who have student visas. As a direct consequence of the order, 50 SU students from the banned countries have been advised by the Sluztker Center not to travel out of the country because they wouldn’t be allowed to return.

Both officials said in the email the sessions are part of both offices efforts’ to support individuals potentially affected by the order.

Chancellor Kent Syverud sent an email on Monday suggesting his support for the students, though he did not explicitly say whether he opposed the ban.

“As the Chancellor said, we must show our support to the members of our community caught up in changing immigration laws,” the officials said in the email distributed on Friday. “The open houses will provide an additional opportunity to offer face-to-face support to campus community members.”

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